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Give Up These Habits To Survive 2017
#1
[Image: rtrmlft.jpg]

We all have them — habits we think are healthy because we heard them somewhere on the news or from a health-conscious friend. And no matter how much we hate them, we just keep doing them because we think they’re good for us.

Take using BMI to tell if you’re a healthy weight. Is it really the best measure of fitness?

Or taking a daily multivitamin. Healthy habit or a little bit of nonsense?

The answers to these questions might surprise you.

http://www.businessinsider.sg/health-myt...tions-2016
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#2
[Image: using-a-standing-desk.jpg]
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#3
Using a standing desk

A recent long-term study looking at data on nearly 4,000 US adults found no benefit in terms of overall risk of dying from standing as opposed to sitting.

In the short-term, however, standing does burn more calories per minute; so if losing weight is all you’re worried about, stand on!
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#4
[Image: using-toilet-seat-liners.jpg]
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#5
Using toilet seat liners

Viruses like HIV and herpes are fragile, meaning they don’t survive very well outside of a nice, warm human body. By the time you sit down on a public toilet seat — even if it was recently shared by someone else — most harmful pathogens likely wouldn’t be able to infect you.

Plus, your skin is an effective block against any microbes. (Unless, of course, you have a cut or open wound there, which could allow the bacteria to get in.)
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#6
[Image: eating-only-low-fat-foods.jpg]
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#7
Eating only low-fat foods

According to recommendations from the USDA in the ’90s, millions of Americans seeking to lose weight opted for a low-fat, high-starch diet. They chose margarine over butter, “fat-free” instead of “regular,” and curbed their indulgence on rich, creamy foods. But it didn’t work.

An eight-year trial involving almost 50,000 women, roughly half of whom went on a low-fat diet, found that those on the low-fat plan didn’t lower their risk of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or heart disease. Plus, they didn’t lose much weight, if any. New recommendations show that healthy fats, like those from nuts, fish, and avocados, are actually good for you in moderation! So add them back into your diet if you haven’t already.
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#8
[Image: using-bmi-to-tell-if-youre-a-healthy-weight.jpg]
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#9
Using BMI to tell if you’re a healthy weight

Sometime during your last doctor’s visit, your physician probably had you hop on a scale to determine whether you were a healthy weight. After weighing and measuring you, she might have shown you a colorful body mass index (BMI) chart.

In reality, the BMI, which was invented in the 1830s, is not a great measure of fitness when used on its own. Obesity experts say the BMI has several major problems, including the fact that it ignores two important factors: 1) how much body fat you’re carrying around, and 2) your waist circumference, which can be a good measure of your risk for certain diseases, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
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#10
[Image: avoiding-gluten.jpg]
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