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How To Make 6 Digit A Month In A Tranquil Environment
#1
[Image: 103879206-GettyImages-477325706.1910x100...1471551865]

Jared Dillian wanted to break up with Corporate America while still having an open relationship with Wall Street. He had flirted with the idea of producing a stock market newsletter for years, but the timing never seemed right. Until one day — timing chose him.

On the morning of Sept. 15, 2008, he boarded his usual bus in New Jersey to take him to midtown Manhattan. He got off at Port Authority and walked the few blocks to his office. And when he arrived at 7 a.m. the building was surrounded by television cameras and reporters. He pushed past the media mob and snuck through the revolving doors. He rode the elevator up to his floor and then walked to his desk. "We just sat there," he said. "Nobody knew what to do."

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/08/19/this-ex-t...ntary.html
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#2
Lehman Brothers, his employer for the last eight years, had just filed for bankruptcy.
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#3
Everyone around him thought this was a worst-case scenario, but Dillian, then the head of ETF trading, saw an opportunity for himself. Over the years he had created a cult following with his trading commentary. Every day he'd write a timely interpretation of what was happening in the markets and then send it to his clients. "The highlight of my trading days was to write about the markets. I'd just pound the keyboard whenever it hit me. I loved trading, but it was taking a massive toll on me," Dillian said. "It was time to start something new."
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#4
Divorcing from Corporate America can be hard. There's a sense of stability with a salary, benefits and 401(k). It feels like a safe place. Also, depending on where you work, there's a comradery that comes with working around like-minded people. As people get older, the capacity to take professional risks sometimes decreases. Very often you hear people say: I should have left five years ago, but it's too late now.
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#5
"IN THE BEGINNING, DILLIAN’S MORNING ROUTINE CONSISTED OF GETTING TO HIS OFFICE AT 7 A.M., READING THE NEWS, THROWING UP IN A TRASH CAN NEXT TO HIS DESK AND WRITING FOR HOURS. HE THREW UP EVERY SINGLE DAY FOR THREE MONTHS STRAIGHT."
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#6
Dillian worked (showed up) for the entire week during Lehman's bankruptcy. And just as he was saying goodbye to trading; Barclays picked up Lehman's U.S. business for just $250 million. He suddenly had a job again — if he wanted. "In addition to wanting to be a writer, I just couldn't do that job anymore," he said. "So I quit."
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#7
He sat down at his Lehman Brother's computer for the last time and fired off a final note to his clients: "I'm starting a newsletter… Who wants to sign up?" And over 900 people responded "yes" to his inquiry.
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#8
It was a great start.
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#9
"I'm doing the math in my head, $600 a year times 900 clients. I can make that work. I was ready to start the Daily Dirtnap." (A dirtnap is Old School Wall Street slang – used mostly on the West Coast. As Dillian explains on the site, it means "a disorderly collapse in price accompanied by a disappearance of liquidity, where selling accelerates and bids vanish due to fear of the presence of news." So, for example, Lehman Brothers "took a dirtnap.")
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#10
Just like an investment banker who merges two synergistic companies, Dillian did it with his passions: the markets and writing. He found two things he liked and seemed to be very good at and created a whole new career for himself. He was finally able to leave the corporate culture behind.
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