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How Will People Judge You In 2017, And Why Bother?
#1
[Image: annoyed-phone.jpg]

This post from LinkedIn Influencer Travis Bradberry originally appeared on LinkedIn.

The human brain is hardwired to judge. This survival mechanism makes it very hard to meet someone without evaluating and interpreting their behavior.

http://www.businessinsider.com/8-small-s...ity-2017-1
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#2
While we tend to think that our judgments are based on the content of conversations and other obvious behaviors, the research says otherwise.

In fact, the majority of our judgments are focused on smaller, subtler things, such as handshakes and body language. We often form complete opinions about people based solely on these behaviors.
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#3
We are so good at judging other people's personalities based on small things that, in a University of Kansas study, subjects accurately predicted people's personality traits, such as extroversion/introversion, emotional stability, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness, simply by looking at pictures of the shoes they wore.
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#4
Our unconscious behaviors have a language of their own, and their words aren't always kind. These behaviors have likely become an integral part of who you are, and if you don't spend much time thinking about them, now is a good time to start, because they could be sabotaging your career.
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#5
1. How you treat waiters and receptionists

How you treat support staff is so indicative of your makeup that it has become a common interview tactic. By gauging how you interact with support staff on your way in and out of the building, interviewers get a sense for how you treat people in general.
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#6
Most people act the part when they're speaking to the hiring manager or other "important" people, but some will pull a Jekyll and Hyde act the moment they walk out the door, treating others with disdain or indifference. Business lunches are another place this comes to light. No matter how nice you are to the people you have lunch with, it's all for naught if those people witness you behaving badly toward others.
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#7
2. How often you check your phone

There's nothing more frustrating than someone pulling out their phone mid-conversation. Doing so conveys a lack of respect, attention, listening skills, and willpower. Unless it's an emergency, it's wise to keep your phone holstered.
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#8
A study from Elon University confirms that pulling out your phone during a conversation lowers both the quality and quantity of face-to-face interactions.
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#9
3. Repetitive, nervous habits

Touching your nails or face or picking at your skin typically indicates that you're nervous, overwhelmed, and not in control. Research from the University of Michigan suggests that these nervous habits are indicative of a perfectionistic personality, and that perfectionists are more likely to engage in these habits when they're frustrated or bored.
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#10
4. How long you take to ask questions

Have you ever had a conversation with someone where they talked about themselves the entire time? The amount of time someone allows to pass before they take an interest in you is a strong personality indicator.
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